Grab your magnifying glass, good lighting; learn to spot anomalies when verifying ID

But did those fake IDs actually work? Did they fool anyone? Maybe, or maybe not. Today’s fake IDs are fairly sophisticated and look very much like “the real thing.” However, there are still ways to spot a fake ID, whether or not the fake ID is simply false, altered, or even borrowed from another person. It is especially important to check a party’s ID when closing a real estate transaction because identity fraud is a crime that can result in enormous loss. In Texas, for example, on the back of a Driver’s License there is a line which says, “directive to physician.” Pay close attention to the second “i” in the word, “directive.” If the “i” doesn’t have a dot over it, then the Driver’s License is most likely not real and should be further scrutinized very carefully. Not all fake IDs can be identified as easily, though. Some have unusual textures, subtle differences in color or shading, and other anomalies. You need to know what the identification card should look and feel like in order to spot those anomalies. Be ready to look closely with a magnifying glass, under good lighting conditions, and to use all of your detective senses. Don’t be afraid to ask questions in order to compare verbal answers to information shown on the person’s presented ID; any incorrect answer or hesitation can be a red flag. There are numerous websites that provide free information and pointers to help you examine ID cards. In particular, the Virginia Alcoholic Beverage Control Authority publishes a very useful and instructive webpage on “Detecting Fake IDs.” However, you may still want to consider investing in a current ID-checking guide that has illustrations. The Drivers License Guide Co. publishes an annual edition of the ID Checking Guide which is referenced on the Virginia Alcoholic Beverage Control Authority’s website and described as helping “retailers and law enforcement agencies identify fake IDs.” How to Spot a Fake ID[Infographic] © 2014 Drivers License Guide Co.]]>

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