Cyber securiy if something doesn't smell right

If Something Doesn’t Smell Right, It’s Probably Not

It may seem like “Title Insurance 101” – but small mistakes can be signs of fraud or misuse of funds or outright intentional undoing of a clear road to closing on a real estate deal.

It may seem like “Title Insurance 101” – but small mistakes can be signs of fraud or misuse of funds or outright intentional undoing of a clear road to closing on a real estate deal.

Not everyone knows everything all of the time; a thousand items have to fall into place and “add up” in order to make the process smooth and completely unencumbered.

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A power of attorney showing up in the middle of a transaction (or at the end) should be scrutinized. So should cashier’s checks drawn from geographical areas that don’t coincide with the seller’s, buyer’s or property’s locale.

Take a look at the potential red flags below; being aware is half the battle.

Preliminary Title Report/Title Search

Red flags” involving the preliminary title report and title search may include:

  • Ordered by, prepared for, or mailed to a party other than the lender.
  • Property seller is not in title (possible purchase disguised as a refinance or improper property flip).
  • Seller owned property for a short time with a cash-out on the sale.
  • Notice of default is recorded (possible cash-out purchase with a straw buyer or foreclosure rescue).
  • Report indicates delinquent property taxes.
  • Report indicates modification agreement on existing loan(s).
  • Title documents show the borrower or Seller on a purchase is not the owner of record.
    • For a purchase transaction, the seller should be the owner of record.
    • For a refinance transaction, the borrower on the loan application should match the owner of record on the title documents.

Escrow/Closing Instructions

“Red flags” involving escrow and closing instructions may include:

  • “Fill in the blank” or generic escrow instructions.
  • Change of sales prices to “fit” the appraisal.
  • Odd amounts paid as a deposit/down payment.
  • Significant or unusual buyer credits or fees.
  • Unusual amendments to the original transaction.
  • Seller on Closing Disclosure different than seller on preliminary title report.
  • Evidence of “white-outs” or alterations without initials.
  • Payoffs to third parties whose lien was not listed on the preliminary title report.
  • Reference to another escrow.
  • Down payment is paid into escrow upon opening.
  • Cash is paid outside of escrow to property seller.
  • Sale is “subject to” property seller acquiring title.
  • Entity acting as the property seller is controlled by, affiliated with, or related to the applicant or another party to the transaction.
  • Buyer is required to use a specific broker/lender.
  • Sale of subject property is not subject to inspection.
  • Power of attorney used with no explanation.
  • Power of attorney is not properly documented/recorded.

Funds to Close

“Red flags” involving funds to close may include:

  • Remitter on cashier’s check or source of the wire is not the borrower.
  • Cashier’s check issued from a bank that is inconsistent with the depository information on application.
  • Cashier’s check issued from a bank branch that is out of the buyer’s geographic area.
  • Dollar amount is incorrectly encoded on check.
  • Sources of funds are questionable

Closing Disclosure/Settlement Statement

“Red flags” involving the closing disclosure or settlement statement may include:

  • Names and addresses of property seller and buyer vary from other loan documentation.
  • Seller’s mailing address is the same as another party to the transaction.
  • Excessive real estate agent commissions paid.
  • Real estate commission paid, but no realtors listed on the purchase contract.
  • Sales price differs from sales contract.
  • Reference is made to undisclosed secondary financing or double escrow.
  • Rent prorated on owner-occupied transactions.
  • Zero amount due to/from buyer.
  • Closing Disclosure or escrow instructions contain unusual credits, disbursements, related parties, delinquent loans paid off, or multiple mortgages paid off.
  • Payoffs for items not consistent with liens listed on title commitment.
  • Excessive seller paid marketing, administrative, assignment or trust fees.
  • Payouts to unknown parties.
  • Terms of the closed mortgage differ from the terms approved by the underwriter.
  • Date of settlement is delayed without explanation.

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This blog contains general information only, not intended to be relied upon as, nor a substitute for, specific professional advice. We accept no responsibility for loss occasioned to any purpose acting on or refraining from action as a result of any material on this blog.

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