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Don’t Get Shut Down Due to “Spam”

Don’t think you can download or even ask for someone else’s email address list unless you know for certain those recipients – each and every one of them – has opted into receive your content.

We’ve previously offered our thoughts on the importance of a well-built email list of customers.

While some consider email “old-school” in the face of loads of social media platforms and texting, beautifully built content contained on your website, email still connects you to your audience in ways social media platforms might not.

You need email addresses. You need new email addresses. You need an email distribution list that is constantly growing and evolving.

Why?

Because engaging your clients and colleagues in a narrative about your business, while also providing useful information, is powerful in establishing you as an industry leader and establishing your brand.

But don’t think you can download or even ask for someone else’s email address list unless you know for certain those recipients – each and every one of them – has opted into receive your content.

To do otherwise, to poach or duplicate or take anyone else’s email address list without first getting a recipient’s okay to receive – or better, without getting the recipient’s email address directly from them – is “spamming,” and the implications are not pretty.

Spamming your audience could result in getting permanently banned from your recipient’s inbox such as if she hits the “do not contact” button or flags you as spam on her email client. Spamming your audience can even result in getting yourself permanently banned from your email management service.

When you think about it, sending unsolicited emails is not even helpful toward getting your message to the masses because these recipients have expressed zero interest in your offer – they may not even know who you are.

You’re better off taking the slow and steady approach to building your email database. Here are just a few ideas for building your email database:

  1. Create an email subscription form for your blog
  2. Promote contests that require an email address for entry
  3. Offer downloads that are accessible only by volunteering an email address
  4. Share a subscribe link to your social media pages

Always tell your would-be subscribers what they should expect. Do you email once per month or once a week? What type of information is included in your distributions?

By building your email list the right way, you’ll ensure you have quality contacts who are more likely to engage with your message.

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3 costly PR pitching mistakes & how to avoid them

Successful public relations is all about relationships.

While securing a story in a prime publication is terrific, building solid relationships with the press is the golden ticket to getting that story published.

Think about it: Journalists receive dozens, if not hundreds, of story pitches every day, most of them mass-produced pitches that end up in a laptop’s trash bin, often unread.

To set yourself apart from every Mary, Marty and Michael that pitches a story, you’ve got to earn and cultivate a trusting relationship with the journalists that cover your beat and your business. To achieve that goal, you’ve got to do your research and ensure that you aren’t making mistakes along the way. Suffice it to say that every detail matters. Here are some ideas to consider as you aim to become a trusted member of the media

7 ways to build better relationships with journalists

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Major news outlets generally get three times the average amount of email in pitches alone. There is a lot of noise, and most of it is irrelevant to the topics that each journalist covers.

7 steps to DIY PR

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Put yourself in the shoes of any busy journalist who gets over a hundred emails a day asking for their time and attention.


Real Estate Corner
While home prices are rising, buyers aren’t biting

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While home prices are rising, buyers are baulking at the price tags and submitting fewer offers because they’re being priced out of the market.

Alliant National Title Insurance Company Appoints Vice President – Southwest Underwriting Counsel

Jean E. Bailey, Esq. is a state-wide, industry recognized speaker and instructor.

LONGMONT, Colo. – Alliant National Title Insurance Company, a unique title insurance underwriter that partners with independent agents to improve their competitive position in the marketplace, announces the hiring of Jean E. Bailey, Esq. as Vice President, Southwest Underwriting Counsel.

Bailey is a published co-author whose works include Another Dead Seller? How to Keep Your Deal Alive, presented at The 21st Annual Robert C. Sneed Texas Land Title Institute in 2011 and Closing LLCs: Tips and Traps for the Unwary, presented at The 28th Annual Robert C. Sneed Texas Land Title Institute in 2018.

“Working with Alliant National is an exciting adventure in that the company culture of helping others allows me to bring all facets of my expertise to a growing company,” Bailey says. “I chose Alliant National because it is fully committed to agents and their agents’ success.”

A Texas resident since 1970, Bailey lived in Parker County for over 25 years, and recently moved to the Austin area.

She served for over 24 years in a variety of capacities for Rattikin Title Company out of Fort Worth, Texas, and she is a state-wide and industry recognized speaker and instructor to title and real estate professionals on various real estate and legal issues.

“Jean brings an ideal combination of success, seasoned expertise and commitment to the industry, one that pairs perfectly with Alliant National’s culture and mission,” says Phyllis J. Mulder, Alliant National Chief Legal Officer and Executive Vice President. “We know we are lucky to have her and look forward to our work together.”

Bailey took her B.A. from the University of Texas at Arlington and her J.D. from Baylor University School of Law. She has sat on various community boards, serving in a variety of capacities as a civic leader, including City of Aledo, Texas City Council and City of Aledo, Texas Planning and Zoning Commission.

“Alliant National is very much a forward-thinking company and I’m thrilled to help enrich their continued growth and success,” Bailey says.

About Alliant National Title Insurance Company

The Independent Underwriter for The Independent Agent® Alliant National believes in putting other people first. The company protects the dreams of property owners with secure title insurance and partners with 500+ trusted independent title agents as a licensed underwriter in 24 states and the District of Columbia.

Alliant National is the largest title insurance underwriter in the country with no direct operations to compete against its agents and puts the interests of its agents first. Bolstered by financial stability, strong underwriting capability and independent agents’ in-depth knowledge of local markets, the company has established a nationwide network with deep roots in local communities and a wealth of expertise that is flexible, nuanced and continuously growing.

Visit alliantnational.com for additional information

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Freedom Top 10 FL Agent

Congratulations to Top 10 Alliant National Florida agent Freedom Title in Villages, FL

Congratulations again to Freedom Title in Villages, FL – a Top 10 Alliant National agent in Florida. We honored their amazing team during an awards presentation at a celebratory dinner.

Lisa Yates, Annie Hampton, Dea Hubner, Chris Pedersen, Debra Coffie, Brenda Cannon and Lindsay Harrison were there representing Alliant National, with Tiffany Henderson and her staff at Freedom Title. We had a great time!

View more photos on the Alliant National Facebook page.

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What’s the best technique for breezing through a media interview? Bridging!

You’ve prepared and done your homework. You’re a natural in front of the camera and a designated spokesperson, and you know your subject inside and out.

All of which begs the question: Why should you worry and sweat when a member of the media shoves a microphone under your chin and starts pelting you with questions?

The interview is moving along smoothly. You’re feeling confident and you’re articulate. You’re using all of the right buzzwords and your colleagues are watching your interview on TV and congratulating your shining moment from afar.

Then wham-bam-boom. The interviewer suddenly poses a question that you want to really, really want to avoid answering. Anything but that question, your brain mutters.

In reality, this scenario happens quite a bit, and it’s all too easy to falter when an interviewer lobs a question your way that you want to evade. What to do?

It’s called bridging—and it works. 

Rather than answering the question that you’re desperate to avoid, you strategically pivot the interview to drive home your message.

In essence, you need a “bridge” to pull the conversation back to the main points that you want to convey. It’s imperative that you stay on track, remain poised and continue to deliver your key points to your captive audience—despite the question.

By staying on topic, it allows you to control the conversation and stick to your agenda.

The key to bridging successfully is always having a pipeline of phrases and words stored away in your head that ensures that you can pivot away from the ick-question and steer the interview back to the points that you want to amplify.

If you need time to think, give yourself a few seconds by initially responding with “That’s a great question—one that I think about often,” and then provide a “bridge” statement that can start with “What’s important to remember…” or “Let’s not forget…” both of which are transitions that allow you to tailor your answer with compelling information that effectively articulates your main points and speaks to your audience. Just remember that everything is on the record and it’s crucial to tell the truth.

How bridging puts your media interview back on track

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A media interview is an important opportunity to speak directly to your audience, but don’t let the interviewer drive the conversation.

The bridging technique – how to get over that bridge

Put simply, the bridging technique allows the interviewee to move the conversation on from a negative or unhelpful question posed by the interviewer.


Real Estate Corner
Make a profit on your flipped house by avoiding costly pitfalls

Flipping houses is a huge trend in the housing arena. But how do you make sure that that your flip isn’t a flop?

This blog contains general information only, not intended to be relied upon as, nor a substitute for, specific professional advice. We accept no responsibility for loss occasioned to any purpose acting on or refraining from action as a result of any material on this blog.

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The Independent Underwriter for the Independent Agent®